Santa Fe

Welcome to Santa Fe's premier informational website, SantaFeNM.info . . . . your link to everything Santa Fe!
The creator of this website's family heritage dates back to before Santa Fe was recognized as a State. That combined with her world wide travel experience make this website one of the most informative that you will find. In addition to links to Santa Fe's preferred lodging, dining, theater and more, you will find special notes included throughout the website that make it interesting, unique and delightful. Enjoy!

 


Present Day Indian Feast Day - Picture Jack Parsons

Native American Indians - In ancient times Santa Fe was a place of wild beauty. Native people hunted and fished in the mountains and planted their crops in the fertile valleys. Although the arrival and eventual domination of Europeans brought religious suppression, military incursions, and disease to the region's Native American's, their cultures survived. Today there are eight Indian pueblos with sovereign governments in northern New Mexico - VISIT OUR PUEBLOS PAGE. Indian art fills Santa Fe galleries and museums. Visiting a pueblo, especially for a ceremonial dance, is a moving experience. But it is important to observe common courtesy and a few special rules. Dances are spiritual ceremonies, not spectacles. It is respectful to refrain from asking questions and to give tribal members the best views. Don't walk on private property or touch kivas. Photography is restricted and sometimes prohibited. Go with an open heart and you will be rewarded with a lasting memory.

Spanish - The small group of Spanish settlers who struggled across the baking desert and up the steep mountains to northern New Mexico nearly 400 years ago were a hardy and tenacious lot. To survive in this remote outpost of the Spanish Empire, they drew closely together and established the core values of family and faith that remain at the heart of 21st century Santa Fe. Today, many of their gracious adobe churches and homes still stand and thousands of their descendants ensure that Hispanic culture is just as strong as the adobe walls. Artisans working in styles passed down from their ancestors fill galleries, museums, and shops. Spanish influences are everywhere.

Everyone Else - Ranchers, cowboys, merchants, and pioneers came to explore and sometimes exploit Santa Fe's untamed wilderness. In the early 1800's the region was a mystery to most Americans. Spain closely guarded its territories, keeping foreigners out but then Spanish rule collapsed, the Santa Fe Trail opened, and droves of Americans and Europeans poured in to seek new fortunes. Railroads arrived and tales of this exotic land brought the first tourists. Soon artists from all over the world moved to Santa Fe, bringing their bohemian flair and establishing the city's reputation as an art colony.

10,000 B.C. Nomadic Pueblo Indians inhabit the region.
The First Americans - In ancient times Santa Fe was a place of wild beauty. Native people hunted and fished in the mountains and planted their crops in the fertile valleys. They built multistoried dwellings, had complex societies and governments, and journeyed along far-flung trading routes. Their artistry transformed even the most ordinary objects, and their spirituality wove through every aspect of their lives. Although the arrival and eventual domination of Europeans brought religious suppression, military incursions, and disease to the region's Native Americans, their cultures survived. Today there are 19 New Mexico Indian Pueblos with sovereign governments in northern New Mexico. Indian art fills Santa Fe galleries and museums, and Indian people make countless contributions at every level. Visiting a pueblo, especially for a ceremonial dance, is a moving experience. But it is important to observe common courtesy and a few special rules. Dances are spiritual ceremonies, not spectacles. It is respectful to refrain fro m asking questions and to give tribal members the best views. Do not walk on private property or touch kivas. Photography is restricted and sometimes prohibited. If you are invited to share food on a feast day, it is polite to accept, but not to linger. Go with an open heart and you will be rewarded with a lasting memory.
D 850 - 1250 Chaco Canyon was a major ancestral Pueblo Cultural Center. Remote and isolated, it offers few amenities, so come prepared. You will find that the rewards are unlimited. Chaco Culture National Historical Park preserves one of America's most significant and fascinating cultural and historic areas.
Chaco Culture National Historical Park is a very special place. A thousand years ago in what is now the American Southwest, the Anasazi (a Navajo word meaning "ancient ones" or possibly "ancient enemies") built dramatic adobe dwellings, or pueblos. Chaco Canyon was the center of Anasazi civilization, its many large pueblos probably serving as administrative and ceremonial centers for a widespread population. It was a hub of ceremony, trade, and administration for the prehistoric Four Corners area - unlike anything before or since. Chaco is remarkable for its monumental public and ceremonial buildings, and its distinctive architecture. To construct the buildings, along with the associated Chacoan roads, ramps, dams, and mounds, required a great deal of well organized and skillful planning, designing, resource gathering, and construction. The Chacoan people combined pre-planned architectural designs, astronomical alignments, geometry, landscaping, and engineering to create an ancient urban center of spectacular public architecture - one that still amazes and inspires us a thousand years later.

A Chaco Canyon Building Ruin
1250 - 1400 Ancient Indian sites are abandoned as modern Pueblos are founded.

Present Day Taos Pueblo - Photo Scott Fields

1540 Francisco Vasques de Coronado leads the first Spanish Expedition to New Mexico.


Francisco Vasques de Coronado

1598 Don Juan de Onate, New Mexico's first Spanish governor, leads Spanish settlers to Northern New Mexico.


Don Juan de Onate

1610 Santa Fe is established as the capital of the Spanish colony.

1680 Pueblo Indians revolt and expel the Spanish.

1692 Don Diego de Vargas leads the reconquest of New Mexico.

1692 Don Diego de Vargas is the acclaimed New Mexican governor who led the reoccupation of Santa Fe after the Pueblo Revolt of 1680.


Don Diego de Vargas
Don Diego de Vargas was sent from Spain by the King to organize a campaign for the resettlement of Santa Fe. Like his noble conquistador forebears, Don Diego de Vargas was fearlessly intrepid and sincerely pious. The Catholic history of the New World is filled with the feats of such men forceful of character and mind who aspired to greatness of soul and deed. Deeply devoted to Our Lady of the Rosary *La Conquistadora, Don Diego de Vargas took on the difficult mission and vowed to return La Conquistadora to her rightful throne as Patroness and Protectress of the Kingdom and Villa of Santa Fe. It is his remarkable reentry without bloodshed into Santa Fe under the banner of La Conquistadora that made him famous throughout Old and New Spain. "Fiesta de Santa Fe", an exquisite and one of the oldest celebrations in the United States, commemorates the return of the Spanish colonists to Santa Fe and perpetuates the memory of Don Diego de Vargas, Zapata Lujan, and Ponce de Leon el Marquis de la Nava de Brazinas (visit our Fiesta page).

*La Conquistadors is the oldest statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Our Lady) in the United States to whom a constant public devotion has been maintained. It is yard-high, wood-carved statue housed in the Cathedral of Santa Fe. Additional informational can be found on our Church page.

1821 Spanish rule ends; New Mexico is part of Mexico; the Santa Fe Trail opens.

1846 During the war with Mexico, the U.S. claims New Mexico.

1876 Railroads come to Santa Fe.
Personal Note:
In the 1930's my father worked as a young boy unloading produce from freight cars at the Santa Fe Railyard. He has shared with me and my family many interesting stories. The location is now home to one of the most popular restaurants in Santa Fe! For a true taste of
local flavor at a very affordable price go to "Tomasita's" on Guadalupe Street!

1912 New Mexico becomes the 47th American state.




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